Mary (Vigliatura) Stolarczyk
RE/MAX Vision | 508-612-1382 | [email protected]


Posted by Mary (Vigliatura) Stolarczyk on 4/15/2018

Buying a new home is a commitment. Not just to a mortgage but to the house itself, the neighborhood and your local community. And for many, this is part of what makes purchasing a new home so rewarding. To have a place to truly settle into and call their own. Part of that settling in includes crafting a timeless interior that will welcome you home for years to come.

But going about creating a timeless home can feel intimidating. Magazines and television shows focus on the trends and how to keep up with what’s current. Following these cues will only leave you with a home that will become quickly outdated.  

The key is to mix a variety of styles both old and new. Resist settling for one particular style for a home that seamlessly transcends the decades to come. And while you don’t want to fully jump into any one trend, adding a few accent pieces will keep your home fresh and modern. Art, throw pillows, and small details are the perfect decor pieces to take advantage of trends with. Large investment pieces, however, are best kept neutral and in a style that has already proven itself to be classic.

Styles that earn the title of classic are usually simple with just one element that reflects the era of its inspiration. Think a couch with tufting but in a warm beige or a table with ornate millwork that boasts its natural wood coloring. Whereas a tufted couch in a print or ornate millwork painted a color from a trend that has come and gone will date the look of your whole room.

Neutral colors are best used for the majority of your color palette, leaving color for your accent pieces. That doesn’t mean your home needs to lack depth, however. Choose different tones for your paint swatches and reach for a variety of textures when adding fabrics. Having a diverse range of tones and textures will add visual interest without depending on color to do the job.

Natural elements such as wood, stone, and glass also help to bring depth to your neutral color palette and maintain a timeless look. Wood flooring is well worth the cost in the long run both in terms of maintenance and style. An exposed brick wall makes a statement without becoming dated. A leather couch or armchair adds warmth and sophistication. While cotton, linen and wool textiles add natural texture to your furnishings.

Homebuyers often dream about the decades to come spent in their new home’s rooms. They want to spend time living life’s moments to the fullest and not fussing over decor every ten years. Creating a timeless look for your home doesn’t have to be difficult or expensive. Keeping to a neutral color palette and natural elements guarantee a classic home that you will love coming home to for years to come.  




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Mary (Vigliatura) Stolarczyk on 5/21/2017

Buying a new home is an exciting prospect. Touring a house can feel like walking around your favorite store, picking out all of the things you love. It's easy to get distracted by things like fresh paint or nice furniture and forget to look for important structural aspects of the home that can make or break a deal. Most sellers will be honest and straightforward with you about the state of the home. In some cases, they are required by law to inform you about costly issues with the home (lead paint or sewage issues, for example). Other times, a seller is under no legal obligation to inform you about potential problems with the home. In these instances, you'll need to rely on your own senses. To help you out, we've compiled a list of the top ten red flags to beware of when buying a home.

  1. Fresh paint  It's common practice when selling a house to put a fresh coat of paint on the walls. It's an inexpensive way to spruce up the home for potential buyers. Sometimes, however, the paint is used as a quick fix for hiding more serious issues. Water damage, mold, and mildew can all be covered up, momentarily, by a coat of paint.
  2. Strong odors We say "strong" rather than "bad" odors because sometimes someone selling a home will try to mask bad smells with air fresheners or candles. Bad smells in a house can be the result of plumbing issues, humidity, indoor smokers, water damage, pet urine, uncleanliness, and any number of undesirable things.
  3. Bad roofing Missing, broken or stacked shingles are all signs that the roof is in need of repair--a costly fix you probably want to avoid if buying a new home.
  4. Cracked foundation A damaged foundation could be a sign of serious structural problems with the house. Especially in sloped areas, cracked foundations can lead to water damage in the basement.
  5. Poor wiring  Don't be afraid to ask to test out the lights and outlets in a home or take a look at breaker boxes. Flickering lighting and faulty outlets are signs that a home is in need of electric work.
  6. Pest issues  Many people underestimate the power of insects when it comes to damaging a home. Wood-eating termites and carpenter ants can both devastate the structure of a home and usually results in an expensive repair. Noticing ants is a huge red flag, but if you suspect a home could have an infestation for any reason try to get it inspected by a pest control firm before you make the deal.
  7. Locked doors and off-limit rooms  When touring a home there should be no areas that you aren't allowed to see. A locked door or "do not enter" sign are all red flags that the seller may be hiding something in that room.
  8. Leaking faucets Small plumbing issues like leaky faucets or toilets that run excessively are signs that there could be even larger issues with the plumbing in the house.
  9. Deserted neighborhood Multiple homes for sale in the neighborhood, deteriorating buildings and closed businesses are all signs of a problem neighborhood. It could be due to economic issues or a decaying community, but either way these are things you'll want to consider before moving into a new neighborhood.
  10. Defective windows  Windows that are sealed shut, fogged up, or won't open or close are all signs of costly repairs. You're going to depend on windows for the security of your home, lighting and aesthetic, and to a minor degree for retaining heat. They should all function properly.